Idioms

    do/turn the trick, to achieve the desired effect or result: Another turn of the pliers should do the trick.
    turn a trick, Slang. (of a prostitute) to engage in a sexual act with a customer.

Origin of trick

1375–1425; late Middle English trik (noun) < Old North French trique deceit, derivative of trikier to deceive < Vulgar Latin *triccāre, for Latin trīcārī to play tricks
SYNONYMS FOR trick
Related formstrick·er, nountrick·ing·ly, adverbout·trick, verb (used with object)un·tricked, adjective

Synonym study

1. Trick , artifice , ruse , stratagem , wile are terms for crafty or cunning devices that are intended to deceive. Trick , the general term, refers usually to an underhanded act designed to cheat someone, but it sometimes refers merely to a pleasurable deceiving of the senses: to win by a trick. Like trick , but to a greater degree, artifice emphasizes the cleverness, ingenuity, or cunning with which the proceeding is devised: an artifice of diabolical ingenuity. Ruse and stratagem emphasize the purpose for which the trick is designed; ruse is the more general term of the two, and stratagem sometimes implies a more elaborate procedure or a military application: He gained entrance by a ruse. His stratagem gave them command of the hill. W ile emphasizes the disarming effect of the trick upon those who are deceived: His wiles charmed them into trusting him. 18. See cheat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for trick out (1 of 2)

trick out

trick up


verb

(tr, adverb) to dress up; deck outtricked out in frilly dresses

British Dictionary definitions for trick out (2 of 2)

trick

/ (trɪk) /

noun

verb

to defraud, deceive, or cheat (someone), esp by means of a trick
Derived Formstricker, nountrickless, adjective

Word Origin for trick

C15: from Old Northern French trique, from trikier to deceive, from Old French trichier, ultimately from Latin trīcārī to play tricks
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with trick out (1 of 2)

trick out


Ornament or adorn, especially ostentatiously or garishly, as in She was all tricked out in beads and fringe and what-have-you. This term uses trick in the sense of “dress up” or “decorate,” a usage dating from about 1500. [Early 1700s]

Idioms and Phrases with trick out (2 of 2)

trick


In addition to the idioms beginning with trick

  • trick or treat
  • trick out
  • tricks of the trade

also see:

  • bag of tricks
  • confidence game (trick)
  • dirty tricks
  • do the trick
  • hat trick
  • how's tricks
  • not miss a trick
  • teach an old dog new tricks
  • that does it (the trick)
  • turn a trick
  • up to one's old tricks
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.