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trivet

1
[ triv-it ]
/ ˈtrɪv ɪt /
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noun
a small metal plate with short legs, especially one put under a hot platter or dish to protect a table.
a three-footed or three-legged stand or support, especially one of iron placed over a fire to support cooking vessels or the like.
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Origin of trivet

1
1375–1425; late Middle English trevet,Old English trefet, apparently blend of Old English thrifēte three-footed and Latin triped-, stem of tripēs three-footed (with Vulgar Latin -e- for Latin -i-)

Other definitions for trivet (2 of 2)

trivet2

or triv·ette

[ triv-it ]
/ ˈtrɪv ɪt /

noun
a special knife for cutting pile loops, as of velvet or carpets.

Origin of trivet

2
Origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use trivet in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for trivet

trivet
/ (ˈtrɪvɪt) /

noun
a stand, usually three-legged and metal, on which cooking vessels are placed over a fire
a short metal stand on which hot dishes are placed on a table
as right as a trivet old-fashioned in perfect health

Word Origin for trivet

Old English trefet (influenced by Old English thrifēte having three feet), from Latin tripēs having three feet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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