troll

1
[ trohl ]
/ troʊl /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

noun

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Origin of troll

1
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English trollen “to roll, stroll,” from Middle French troller “to run here and there, ramble,” from Middle High German trollen “to walk or run with short steps”; defs. 7, 13, 18 are influenced by troll2

OTHER WORDS FROM troll

troller, nounun·trolled, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH troll

trawl, troll .

Definition for troll (2 of 2)

troll2
[ trohl ]
/ troʊl /

noun

(in Scandinavian folklore) any of a race of supernatural beings, sometimes conceived as giants and sometimes as dwarfs, inhabiting caves or subterranean dwellings.
Slang. a person who lives or sleeps in a park or under a viaduct or bridge, as a derelict or poor person.

Origin of troll

2
First recorded in 1610–20, troll is from the Old Norse word troll demon
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for troll

British Dictionary definitions for troll (1 of 2)

troll1
/ (trəʊl) /

verb

noun

Derived forms of troll

troller, noun

Word Origin for troll

C14: from Old French troller to run about; related to Middle High German trollen to run with short steps

British Dictionary definitions for troll (2 of 2)

troll2
/ (trəʊl) /

noun

(in Scandinavian folklore) one of a class of supernatural creatures that dwell in caves or mountains and are depicted either as dwarfs or as giants

Word Origin for troll

C19: from Old Norse: demon; related to Danish trold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012