truckle

1
[ truhk-uhl ]
/ ˈtrʌk əl /

verb (used without object), truck·led, truck·ling.

to submit or yield obsequiously or tamely (usually followed by to): Don't truckle to unreasonable demands.

Origin of truckle

1
1605–15; special use of obsolete truckle to sleep on a truckle bed. See truckle2

Related forms

truck·ler, nountruck·ling·ly, adverbun·truck·led, adjectiveun·truck·ling, adjective

Definition for truckle (2 of 2)

truckle

2
[ truhk-uh l ]
/ ˈtrʌk əl /

noun

a pulley.

Origin of truckle

2
1375–1425; late Middle English trocle sheave, roller < Anglo-French < Latin trochlea pulley. See trochlea
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for truckle

British Dictionary definitions for truckle (1 of 2)

truckle

1
/ (ˈtrʌkəl) /

verb

(intr usually foll by to) to yield weakly; give in

Derived Forms

truckler, noun

Word Origin for truckle

C17: from obsolete truckle to sleep in a truckle bed; see truckle ²

British Dictionary definitions for truckle (2 of 2)

truckle

2
/ (ˈtrʌkəl) /

noun

a small wheel; caster
a small barrel-shaped cheese

verb

(intr) to roll on truckles
(tr) to push (a piece of furniture) along on truckles

Word Origin for truckle

C15 trokel, from Anglo-Norman trocle, from Latin trochlea sheaf of a pulley; see trochlea
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012