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View synonyms for truism

truism

[ troo-iz-uhm ]

noun

  1. a self-evident, obvious truth.

    Synonyms: platitude, cliché



truism

/ ˈtruːɪzəm /

noun

  1. an obvious truth; platitude


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Confusables Note

Contrary to what some people believe, the word truism is not a more elegant word for truth. While the word truth can occasionally be used to refer to a “truism,” since truisms are often true, the reverse—the use of truism to mean “truth”—is unwise. Truism stands for a certain kind of truth—a cliché, a platitude, something so self-evident that it is hardly worth mentioning. One can use it to accuse another writer or speaker of saying something so obvious or evident and trite that pointing it out is pointless. To say that a statement is a truism when you intend to compliment it as truthful, factual, even provable, will merely serve to confuse those who know that calling something a truism is not praise, but a criticism or insult. Note, however, that truism is used in a technical sense in mathematics or philosophy for restating something that is already known from its terms or premises. Examples of such truisms include: “Men are not women” and “Since the circumference of a circle equals twice the radius multiplied by π (2π r ), it equals the diameter multiplied by π (π d ).”

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Derived Forms

  • truˈistic, adjective

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Other Words From

  • tru·istic tru·isti·cal adjective

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Word History and Origins

Origin of truism1

First recorded in 1700–10; true + -ism

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Word History and Origins

Origin of truism1

C18: from true + -ism

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Example Sentences

After upset World Series losses in 2019 and 2021, the Astros should know by now that every Fall Classic underdog has its day — a truism more accurate now than ever.

Coaches use the line as a truism, and it often spreads to their players.

If one of the truisms of connection is to meet people where they are, then Kennedy has it down.

From Time

Our analysis also found that a longtime truism in polling — that surveys using live callers are more accurate — is no longer true.

This is a truism of life, but we can’t resist manufacturing false gods.

The amendment states but a truism that all is retained which has not been surrendered.

There is a truism bandied about that more people like to read about baseball than watch it.

The religious basis of the fiercest opposition to same-sex marriage is a truism.

Each of us gathered there had lived the truism of all wars: what can go wrong will go wrong.

That old truism that hawks are the most capable of making peace carries a lot of weight in middle Israel.

In other words, it is a truism, mere equation in terms, telling nothing whatever.

Nevertheless, it is a truism which men are none the worse of being reminded of now and then.

That the day may begin with calm and sunshine, yet end in clouds and tempest—or vice versa—is a truism which need not be enforced.

Somehow this statement, though a truism, did not seem to fit on to previous remarks.

It is a mere truism to remark that in every political question the main controversy is complicated by a number of side issues.

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