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trustee

[truh-stee]Law.
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noun
  1. a person, usually one of a body of persons, appointed to administer the affairs of a company, institution, etc.
  2. a person who holds the title to property for the benefit of another.
  3. (in New England) a garnishee.
  4. a trusty.
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verb (used with object), trust·eed, trust·ee·ing.
  1. to place in the hands of a trustee or trustees.
  2. (in New England) to garnish.
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Origin of trustee

First recorded in 1640–50; trust + -ee
Can be confusedexecutor trustee trustytrustee trusty
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for trustee

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • He was a commissioner, or a board, or a trustee, 'or something.'

    Little Dorrit

    Charles Dickens

  • He was Chairman of this, Trustee of that, President of the other.

    Little Dorrit

    Charles Dickens

  • In a similar way I am, or I have been, trustee of one kind or other for scores of our customers.

    A Tale of Two Cities

    Charles Dickens

  • I have seen Mr. Bradley and he has consented to act as trustee for me.

    Fair Harbor

    Joseph Crosby Lincoln

  • It was Judge Knowles' wish that you be my trustee, and, as you know, it was mine also.

    Fair Harbor

    Joseph Crosby Lincoln


British Dictionary definitions for trustee

trustee

noun
  1. a person to whom the legal title to property is entrusted to hold or use for another's benefit
  2. a member of a board that manages the affairs and administers the funds of an institution or organization
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for trustee

n.

"person who is responsible for the property of another," 1640s, from trust (v.) + -ee.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper