Dictionary.com

tuckahoe

[ tuhk-uh-hoh ]
/ ˈtʌk əˌhoʊ /
Save This Word!

noun
Also called Indian bread. the edible, underground sclerotium of the fungus Poria cocos, found on the roots of trees in the southern United States.
(usually initial capital letter) a Virginian, especially one inhabiting the lowland east of the Blue Ridge.
QUIZ
SHALL WE PLAY A "SHALL" VS. "SHOULD" CHALLENGE?
Should you take this quiz on “shall” versus “should”? It should prove to be a quick challenge!
Question 1 of 6
Which form is used to state an obligation or duty someone has?

Origin of tuckahoe

First recorded in 1605–15, Americanism; earlier applied to various roots and underground fungi, from Virginia Algonquian (English spelling) tockwhogh, tockawhoughe, taccaho “arrow arum root” (used for bread), derivative of Proto-Algonquian takwah- “to pound (it) fine, reduce (it) to flour” (unattested); compare Shawnee takhwa “bread”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use tuckahoe in a sentence

FEEDBACK