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turbofan

[ tur-boh-fan ]
/ ˈtɜr boʊˌfæn /
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noun
a jet engine having a large impeller that takes in air, part of which is used in combustion of fuel, the remainder being mixed with the products of combustion to form a low-velocity exhaust jet.

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Also called turbofan engine.

Origin of turbofan

First recorded in 1940–45; turbo- + fan1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use turbofan in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for turbofan

turbofan
/ (ˈtɜːbəʊˌfæn) /

noun
Also called: high bypass ratio engine a type of by-pass engine in which a large fan driven by a turbine and housed in a short duct forces air rearwards around the exhaust gases in order to increase the propulsive thrust
an aircraft driven by one or more turbofans
the ducted fan in such an engine
Also called (for senses 1, 2): fanjet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for turbofan

turbofan
[ tûrbō-făn′ ]

A type of gas turbine in which the fan driving air into a turbojet also forces additional air around the outside of the turbine, combining it with the exhaust of the turbojet to provide thrust. Turbofans are quieter than simple turbojets and somewhat more fuel efficient, and are widely used in commercial aircraft.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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