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View synonyms for turbulent

turbulent

[ tur-byuh-luhnt ]

adjective

  1. being in a state of agitation or tumult; disturbed:

    turbulent feelings or emotions.

    Synonyms: disordered, tempestuous, violent, tumultuous, agitated

  2. characterized by, or showing disturbance, disorder, etc.:

    the turbulent years.

  3. given to acts of violence and aggression:

    the turbulent young soldiers.



turbulent

/ ˈtɜːbjʊlənt /

adjective

  1. being in a state of turbulence
  2. wild or insubordinate; unruly


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Derived Forms

  • ˈturbulently, adverb

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Other Words From

  • turbu·lent·ly adverb
  • un·turbu·lent adjective
  • un·turbu·lent·ly adverb

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Word History and Origins

Origin of turbulent1

First recorded in 1530–40; from Latin turbulentus “restless,” from turb(a) “turmoil” + -ulentus -ulent

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Word History and Origins

Origin of turbulent1

C16: from Latin turbulentus , from turba confusion

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Compare Meanings

How does turbulent compare to similar and commonly confused words? Explore the most common comparisons:

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Example Sentences

Jackson has a new nickname since his turbulent voyage across the bay, he said.

Still, social media can be a turbulent distribution channel, making for disrupted media plans.

From Digiday

Mindfulness apps are booming as stressed-out people tune in for help coping with a turbulent world.

From Quartz

“He guided our school system through some very turbulent times and he’s demonstrated a deep commitment to our students, our families, our staff and our community,” said Brenda Wolff, president of the school board.

Like many of the people who are now fighting over him, Captain America has had a turbulent start to 2021.

From Vox

I wondered who else was making a mark in the field in these turbulent times.

A group of them mentor the turbulent, desperate kids fresh off the streets who are at their most violent when they first arrive.

The turbulent waters caused one of his oars to crack, which—without a motor or a sail—can be severely detrimental to his voyage.

The demonstrations in Hong Kong are undoubtedly affecting an already turbulent Beijing.

Alex Vause also has a much more turbulent home life than Nancy.

The music grew strange and fantastic—turbulent, insistent, plaintive and soft with entreaty.

The mild and amiable Tacitus ruled over a turbulent people only six months.

The malecontents, generally so insolent and turbulent, seemed to be completely cowed.

They pleaded their conscience, and pretended to have received from Heaven the right to be quarrelsome, turbulent, and rebellious.

When that turbulent personage found himself safe in Munster, Rory Oge was one of the outlaws whom he adjured to stand firm.

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turbulenceturbulent flow