Dictionary.com

twig

1
[ twig ]
/ twɪg /
Save This Word!
See synonyms for: twig / twigged / twigging / twiglike on Thesaurus.com

noun

a slender shoot of a tree or other plant.
a small offshoot from a branch or stem.
a small, dry, woody piece fallen from a branch: a fire of twigs.
Anatomy. one of the minute branches of a blood vessel or nerve.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!

Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

Meet Grammar Coach

Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing

Meet Grammar Coach

Improve Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of twig

1
First recorded before 950; Middle English twig, twig(g)e; Old English twig, twigge, twī originally “(something) divided in two”; akin to Old High German zwīg (German Zweig ), Dutch twijg; compare Sanskrit dvikás “double”; see origin at twi-

OTHER WORDS FROM twig

twigless, adjectivetwiglike, adjective

Definition for twig (2 of 3)

twig2
[ twig ]
/ twɪg /
British Informal.

verb (used with object), twigged, twig·ging.

to look at; observe: Now, twig the man climbing there, will you?
to see; perceive: Do you twig the difference in colors?
to understand.

verb (used without object), twigged, twig·ging.

to understand.

Origin of twig

2
First recorded in 1760–70; of uncertain origin; perhaps from Irish tuigim “I understand”; see also dig2

Definition for twig (3 of 3)

twig3
[ twig ]
/ twɪg /

noun British Archaic.

style; fashion.

Origin of twig

3
First recorded in 1805–15; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for twig

British Dictionary definitions for twig (1 of 2)

twig1
/ (twɪɡ) /

noun

any small branch or shoot of a tree or other woody plant
something resembling this, esp a minute branch of a blood vessel

Derived forms of twig

twiglike, adjective

Word Origin for twig

Old English twigge; related to Old Norse dvika consisting of two, Old High German zwīg twig, Old Danish tvige fork

British Dictionary definitions for twig (2 of 2)

twig2
/ (twɪɡ) /

verb twigs, twigging or twigged British informal

to understand (something)
to find out or suddenly comprehend (something)he hasn't twigged yet
(tr) rare to perceive (something)

Word Origin for twig

C18: perhaps from Gaelic tuig I understand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK