Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

unbridled

[uhn-brahyd-ld]
See more synonyms for unbridled on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. not controlled or restrained: unbridled enthusiasm.
  2. not fitted with a bridle.
Show More

Origin of unbridled

1325–75; Middle English unbrydled. See un-1, bridled

unbridle

[uhn-brahyd-l]
verb (used with object), un·bri·dled, un·bri·dling.
  1. to remove the bridle from (a horse, mule, etc.).
  2. to free from restraint.
Show More

Origin of unbridle

1350–1400; Middle English unbridlen. See un-2, bridle (v.)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for unbridled

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • He did not say a word, knowing my unbridled desire to meet danger.

    My Double Life

    Sarah Bernhardt

  • This explains why they may be associated in the delirium of unbridled passions.

  • He had followed a false lure that his own unbridled imagination had lit.

  • What a river it was now, this unbridled Salagua which had been their moat and rampart for so many years!

    Hidden Water

    Dane Coolidge

  • What a terrible ordeal to a mind so untrained—to a temper so unbridled!

    Roland Cashel

    Charles James Lever


British Dictionary definitions for unbridled

unbridled

adjective
  1. with all restraints removed
  2. (of a horse, etc) wearing no bridle
Show More
Derived Formsunbridledly, adverbunbridledness, noun

unbridle

verb (tr)
  1. to remove the bridle from (a horse)
  2. to remove all controls or restraints from
Show More
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unbridled

adj.

late 14c., originally in figurative sense of "unrestrained, ungoverned," from un- (1) "not" + bridled (see bridle (v.)). Cf. Middle Dutch ongebreidelt. Literal sense of "not fitted with a bridle" (of horses) is not recorded before 1550s. The verb unbridle is attested from c.1400 in the literal sense; mid-15c. in the figurative sense.

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper