categorical

[ kat-i-gawr-i-kuhl, -gor- ]
/ ˌkæt ɪˈgɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈgɒr- /

adjective

without exceptions or conditions; absolute; unqualified and unconditional: a categorical denial.
Logic.
  1. (of a proposition) analyzable into a subject and an attribute related by a copula, as in the proposition “All humans are mortal.”
  2. (of a syllogism) having categorical propositions as premises.
of, relating to, or in a category.

QUIZZES

BECOME A PRO CHEF WITH THIS EXQUISITE CUISINE QUIZ!

Even if you can't be a professional chef, you can at least talk like one with this vocabulary quiz.
Question 1 of 9
You may have read the word "simmer" in a recipe or two, but what does it really mean?
Also cat·e·gor·ic [kat-i-gawr-ik, -gor-] /ˌkæt ɪˈgɔr ɪk, -ˈgɒr-/ .

Origin of categorical

First recorded in 1590–1600; from Late Latin catēgoric(us) (from Greek katēgorikós; see category, -ic) + -al1

OTHER WORDS FROM categorical

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for categorical

categorical

categoric

/ (ˌkætɪˈɡɒrɪkəl) /

adjective

unqualified; positive; unconditionala categorical statement
relating to or included in a category
logic another word for categorial

Derived forms of categorical

categorically, adverbcategoricalness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012