unco

[uhng-koh]Scot. and North England
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adjective

remarkable; extraordinary.
unusual; strange.

adverb

remarkably; extremely.

noun, plural un·cos.


Origin of unco

1375–1425; late Middle English; variant of uncouth
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for unco

Historical Examples of unco

  • "It's unco like the night we were wrecked in the Gulf," said Sandy.

  • She was unco curious to hear about my Eppie, and how I came to lay her there.

    Allison Bain

    Margaret Murray Robertson

  • He's unco fu' in his ain house that canna pick a bane in his neighbour's.

    The Proverbs of Scotland

    Alexander Hislop

  • I'll be seeing you the morn's morn, an' unco gude will be the sight o' you for sair een.

    Dear Enemy

    Jean Webster

  • But maybe it was the lauchin' o' the twa lads, for they thocht it unco fun.

    Robert Falconer

    George MacDonald


British Dictionary definitions for unco

unco

1

adjective uncoer or uncoest

unfamiliar, strange, or odd
remarkable or striking

adverb

very; extremely
the unco guid narrow-minded, excessively religious, or self-righteous people

noun plural uncos or uncoes

a novel or remarkable person or thing
obsolete a stranger
(plural) news

Word Origin for unco

C15: variant of uncouth

unco

2

adjective

awkward; clumsy

noun plural uncos

an awkward or clumsy person

Word Origin for unco

C20: shortened form of uncoordinated
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012