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undulate

[ verb uhn-juh-leyt, uhn-dyuh-, -duh-; adjective uhn-juh-lit, -leyt, uhn-dyuh-, -duh- ]
/ verb ˈʌn dʒəˌleɪt, ˈʌn dyə-, -də-; adjective ˈʌn dʒə lɪt, -ˌleɪt, ˈʌn dyə-, -də- /
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See synonyms for: undulate / undulating on Thesaurus.com

verb (used without object), un·du·lat·ed, un·du·lat·ing.
to move with a sinuous or wavelike motion; display a smooth rising-and-falling or side-to-side alternation of movement: The flag undulates in the breeze.
to have a wavy form or surface; bend with successive curves in alternate directions.
(of a sound) to rise and fall in pitch: the wail of a siren undulating in the distance.
verb (used with object), un·du·lat·ed, un·du·lat·ing.
to cause to move in waves.
to give a wavy form to.
adjective
Also un·du·lat·ed . having a wavelike or rippled form, surface, edge, etc.; wavy.
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Origin of undulate

First recorded in 1650–60; from Latin undulātus waved, equivalent to und(a) “wave” + -ul(a)-ule + -ātus -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM undulate

un·du·la·tor, nounnon·un·du·late, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use undulate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for undulate

undulate
/ (ˈʌndjʊˌleɪt) /

verb
to move or cause to move in waves or as if in waves
to have or provide with a wavy form or appearance
adjective (ˈʌndjʊlɪt, -ˌleɪt) undulated
having a wavy or rippled appearance, margin, or forman undulate leaf

Derived forms of undulate

undulator, noun

Word Origin for undulate

C17: from Latin undulātus, from unda a wave
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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