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fallen

[faw-luh n]
verb
  1. past participle of fall.
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adjective
  1. having dropped or come down from a higher place, from an upright position, or from a higher level, degree, amount, quality, value, number, etc.
  2. on the ground; prostrate; down flat: Exhausted, the racers lay fallen by the road.
  3. degraded or immoral.
  4. (of a woman) having lost her chastity.
  5. overthrown, destroyed, or conquered: a fallen city.
  6. dead: fallen troops.
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Related formsun·fall·en, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for unfallen

Historical Examples of unfallen

  • The 'prisoner,' as you call her, is as innocent as the snow yet unfallen from heaven.

    Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII No. 1 January 1848

    Various

  • Again the world was young and unfallen, nor had the gates of Heaven closed.

    Everyday Adventures

    Samuel Scoville

  • If we were unfallen angels, the rule might perhaps be a safe one.

    In the School-Room

    John S. Hart

  • For gasta weardas as an epithet for angels, though then unfallen, cf. line 12a, sup.

    Genesis A

    Anonymous

  • Below the unfallen creation and regenerated humanity is the unregenerated selfish man.

    The Other Side of Evolution

    Alexander Patterson


British Dictionary definitions for unfallen

fallen

verb
  1. the past participle of fall
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adjective
  1. having sunk in reputation or honoura fallen woman
  2. killed in battle with gloryour fallen heroes
  3. defeated
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unfallen

fallen

adj.

c.1400, past participle adjective from fall (v.). Used figuratively for "morally ruined" by 1620s. Meaning "those who have died" attested by 1765. Fallen angel is from 1680s; fallen woman by 1820.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper