definitions
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germinate

[ jur-muh-neyt ]
/ ˈdʒɜr məˌneɪt /
|

verb (used without object), ger·mi·nat·ed, ger·mi·nat·ing.

to begin to grow or develop.
Botany.
  1. to develop into a plant or individual, as a seed, spore, or bulb.
  2. to put forth shoots; sprout; pullulate.
to come into existence; begin.

verb (used with object), ger·mi·nat·ed, ger·mi·nat·ing.

to cause to develop; produce.
to cause to come into existence; create.

Nearby words

germinal membrane, germinal pole, germinal vesicle, germinally, germinant, germinate, germination, germinative, germinative layer, germinoma, germiston

Origin of germinate

1600–10; < Latin germinātus (past participle of germināre to sprout, bud), equivalent to germin- (see germinal) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for ungerminated

  • The first form is found in the cells of ungerminated seeds, in leaves, shoots, etc.

    The Chemistry of Plant Life|Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher

British Dictionary definitions for ungerminated

germinate

/ (ˈdʒɜːmɪˌneɪt) /

verb

to cause (seeds or spores) to sprout or (of seeds or spores) to sprout or form new tissue following increased metabolism
to grow or cause to grow; develop
to come or bring into existence; originatethe idea germinated with me
Derived Formsgerminable or germinative, adjectivegermination, noungerminator, noun

Word Origin for germinate

C17: from Latin germināre to sprout; see germ
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ungerminated

germinate


v.

c.1600, probably a back-formation from germination. Earlier germynen (mid-15c.) was from Latin germinare. Figurative use from 1640s. Related: Germinated; germinating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper