important

[ im-pawr-tnt ]
/ ɪmˈpɔr tnt /

adjective

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Origin of important

1580–90; < Medieval Latin important- (stem of importāns present participle of importāre to be of consequence, weigh, Latin: to carry in, import), equivalent to im- im-1 + port- port5 + -ant- -ant; see import

usage note for important

Both more important and more importantly occur at the beginning of a sentence in all varieties of standard English: More important (or More importantly), her record as an administrator is unmatched. Today, more importantly is the more common, even though some object to its use on the grounds that more important is an elliptical form of “What is more important” and that the adverb importantly could not occur in such a construction. More importantly probably developed by analogy with other sentence-modifying adverbs, as curiously, fortunately, and regrettably.

OTHER WORDS FROM important

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for unimportant

British Dictionary definitions for unimportant (1 of 2)

unimportant
/ (ˌʌnɪmˈpɔːtənt) /

adjective

lacking in significance or valueunimportant matters

British Dictionary definitions for unimportant (2 of 2)

important
/ (ɪmˈpɔːtənt) /

adjective

of great significance or value; outstandingVoltaire is an important writer
of social significance; notable; eminent; esteemedan important man in the town
(when postpositive, usually foll by to) specially relevant or of great concern (to); valued highly (by)your wishes are important to me
an obsolete word for importunate

Derived forms of important

importantly, adverb

Word Origin for important

C16: from Old Italian importante, from Medieval Latin importāre to signify, be of consequence, from Latin: to carry in; see import

usage for important

The use of more importantly as in more importantly, the local council is opposed to this proposal has become very common, but many people still prefer to use more important
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012