Advertisement

View synonyms for unite

unite

1

[ yoo-nahyt ]

verb (used with object)

, u·nit·ed, u·nit·ing.
  1. to join, combine, or incorporate so as to form a single whole or unit.

    Synonyms: merge, marry, consolidate, blend, amalgamate, yoke, unify, link (up), couple, conjoin, associate

  2. to cause to adhere:

    to unite two pieces of wood with glue.

    Synonyms: weld, stick, glue, fuse, bond, connect, cement

  3. to cause to be in a state of mutual sympathy, or to have a common opinion or attitude.
  4. to have or exhibit in union or combination:

    a person who unites generosity and forgiveness.

  5. to join in marriage.


verb (used without object)

, u·nit·ed, u·nit·ing.
  1. to become joined together or combined so as to form a single whole.
  2. to act in concert or agreement.
  3. to share a common opinion, attitude, etc.
  4. to be joined by or as if by adhesion.

unite

2

[ yoo-nahyt, yoo-nahyt ]

noun

  1. a former gold coin of England, equal to 20 shillings, issued under James I and Charles I.

unite

1

/ juːˈnaɪt /

verb

  1. to make or become an integrated whole or a unity; combine
  2. to join, unify or be unified in purpose, action, beliefs, etc
  3. to enter or cause to enter into an association or alliance
  4. to adhere or cause to adhere; fuse
  5. tr to possess or display (qualities) in combination or at the same time

    he united charm with severity

  6. archaic.
    to join or become joined in marriage


unite

2

/ ˈjuːnaɪt; juːˈnaɪt /

noun

  1. an English gold coin minted in the Stuart period, originally worth 20 shillings
Discover More

Derived Forms

  • uˈniter, noun
Discover More

Other Words From

  • u·nita·ble u·nitea·ble adjective
  • u·niter noun
  • nonu·nita·ble adjective
  • nonu·nitea·ble adjective
  • nonu·niting adjective
  • unu·nita·ble adjective
  • unu·niting adjective
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of unite1

First recorded in 1400–50; late Middle English uniten, from Latin ūnītus, past participle of ūnīre “to join together, unite,” equivalent to ūn(us) “one” + -ītus -ite 1

Origin of unite2

First recorded in 1595–1605; noun use of earlier past participle of unite 1, referring to union of England and Scotland
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of unite1

C15: from Late Latin ūnīre, from ūnus one

Origin of unite2

C17: from obsolete unite joined, alluding to the union of England and Scotland (1603)
Discover More

Example Sentences

A weighted blanket will be most effective if each partner has their own along with a larger duvet or comforter on top to unite two sleepers.

Alpha Global forms to unite Alphabet workers around the worldAlpha Global announced its formation earlier this week to unite Alphabet workers around the world, including those from the Alphabet Workers Union in the United States, The Verge reported.

By embracing a content hub, this business was able to unite teams, gain clearer insight of their asset library, and improve productivity and efficiency across the content supply chain.

From Digiday

Something we did agree on, something that I felt was really important, is we felt the necessity of having a poem that spoke to an America uniting together.

These are defining, dividing as well as uniting stories for the country.

From Digiday

The community is sending a strong message that this is not a project to unite us all.

But something that does unite them is a consistent—in fact a constant—engagement with 1787.

There is no possible immigration plan that 218 Republican members of Congress could unite behind.

The newest savior of the party is more likely to split it than unite it.

“There is a definite need for operatives who have the ability and interest to unite conservatives,” Holmes said.

My son,” said Grabantak one evening to Chingatok, “if we are henceforth to live in peace, why not unite and become one nation?

One of her humours was to unite the son of her minister, with a niece of the widowed Queen of Saint Germain's.

By memorising a Correlation, you so unite the two extremes in memory, that you need not afterwards recall the intermediates.

They were to make the same marches, but were not to unite with the first troop, nor with the following one.

To unite with the people of God is good; but to unite with any elsewhere than on the basis of truth, is not to be desired.

Advertisement

Discover More

When To Use

What are other ways to say unite?

To unite is to combine or incorporate two or more things so as to form a single whole or unit. How is unite different from connect and join? Find out on Thesaurus.com

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


unit costunited