definitions
  • synonyms

unseat

[ uhn-seet ]
/ ʌnˈsit /
|
SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR unseat ON THESAURUS.COM

verb (used with object)

to dislodge from a seat, especially to throw from a saddle, as a rider; unhorse.
to remove from political office by an elective process, by force, or by legal action: The corrupt mayor was finally unseated.

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RELATED WORDS

replace, depose, upset, dethrone, dismount, remove

Nearby words

unsearchable, unseasonable, unseasonably, unseasonal, unseasoned, unseat, unseaworthy, unsecure, unsecured, unseduced, unseeded

Origin of unseat

First recorded in 1590–1600; un-2 + seat
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for unseat

British Dictionary definitions for unseat

unseat

/ (ʌnˈsiːt) /

verb (tr)

to throw or displace from a seat, saddle, etc
to depose from office or position
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unseat

unseat


v.

1590s, "to throw down from a seat" (especially on horseback), from un- (2) + seat (v.). Meaning "to deprive of rank or office" is attested from 1610s; especially of elected office in a representative body from 1834. Related: Unseated; unseating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper