subsidize

[suhb-si-dahyz]
verb (used with object), sub·si·dized, sub·si·diz·ing.
  1. to furnish or aid with a subsidy.
  2. to purchase the assistance of by the payment of a subsidy.
  3. to secure the cooperation of by bribery; buy over.
Also especially British, sub·si·dise.

Origin of subsidize

First recorded in 1785–95; subsid(y) + -ize
Related formssub·si·diz·a·ble, adjectivesub·si·di·za·tion, nounsub·si·diz·er, nounde·sub·si·di·za·tion, nounde·sub·si·dize, verb (used with object), de·sub·si·dized, de·sub·si·diz·ing.non·sub·si·dized, adjectiveun·sub·si·dized, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for unsubsidized

Contemporary Examples of unsubsidized

  • At this stage, unsubsidized rates in the exchange have increased considerably.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Obamacare’s Vermont Fail

    Stuart Stevens

    October 22, 2013

  • Union firms will have higher costs than non-union firms, as they cover the extra cost of an unsubsidized union health plan.

  • Nearly 50 million adults are now working as unpaid, unsubsidized family caregivers for aging parents or spouses or  siblings.

    The Daily Beast logo
    It Took a Woman

    Gail Sheehy

    March 21, 2010

Historical Examples of unsubsidized


British Dictionary definitions for unsubsidized

subsidize

subsidise

verb (tr)
  1. to aid or support with a subsidy
  2. to obtain the aid of by means of a subsidy
Derived Formssubsidizable or subsidisable, adjectivesubsidization or subsidisation, nounsubsidizer or subsidiser, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unsubsidized
adj.

1756, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of subsidize.

subsidize

v.

1795, from subsidy + -ize. Originally "to pay to hire" (mercenaries, foreign troops, etc.), also of nations, "to buy neutrality or alliance." Meaning "to bribe" is from 1815. Meaning "to support by grants of (often government) money" is from 1828. Related: Subsidized; subsidizing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper