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unwind

[ uhn-wahynd ]
/ ʌnˈwaɪnd /
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See synonyms for: unwind / unwound on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), un·wound [uhn-wound], /ʌnˈwaʊnd/, un·wind·ing.

to undo or loosen from or as if from a coiled condition: to unwind a rolled bandage; to unwind a coiled rope.
to reduce the tension of; relax: to unwind a person with a drink.
to disentangle or disengage; untwist: to unwind one's legs from around the stool.

verb (used without object), un·wound [uhn-wound], /ʌnˈwaʊnd/, un·wind·ing.

to become unwound.
to become relieved of tension; relax: After work we can have a drink and unwind.

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Origin of unwind

First recorded in 1275–1325; Middle English onwinden; see un-2, wind2
un·wind·a·ble, adjectiveun·wind·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for unwind

unwind
/ (ʌnˈwaɪnd) /

verb -winds, -winding or -wound

to slacken, undo, or unravel or cause to slacken, undo, or unravel
(tr) to disentangle
to make or become relaxedhe finds it hard to unwind after a busy day at work
unwindable, adjectiveunwinder, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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