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uptalk

[ uhp-tawk ]
/ ˈʌpˌtɔk /
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noun

a rise in pitch at the end usually of a declarative sentence, especially if habitual: often represented in writing by a question mark as in Hi, I'm here to read the meter?

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“Evoke” and “invoke” both derive from the same Latin root “vocāre.”

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Origin of uptalk

First recorded in 1990–95; up- + talk. Uptalk was first noted especially among teenage girls and young women, though it is used among the general population
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use uptalk in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for uptalk

uptalk
/ (ˈʌpˌtɔːk) /

noun

a style of speech in which every sentence ends with a rising tone, as if the speaker is always asking a question
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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