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Urey

[ yoor-ee ]
/ ˈyʊər i /
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noun
Harold Clay·ton [kleyt-n], /ˈkleɪt n/, 1893–1981, U.S. chemist: Nobel prize 1934.
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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for Urey

Urey
/ (ˈjʊərɪ) /

noun
Harold Clayton. 1893–1981, US chemist, who discovered the heavy isotope of hydrogen, deuterium (1932), and worked on methods of separating uranium isotopes: Nobel prize for chemistry 1934
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for Urey

Urey
[ yurē ]
Harold Clayton 1893-1981

American chemist who is best known for his discovery of deuterium (or heavy hydrogen) in 1932, for which he was awarded the 1934 Nobel Prize for chemistry. He also developed theories on the formation of the planets and on the synthesis of organic compounds in the Earth's primitive atmosphere.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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