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uric acid

noun

  1. Biochemistry. a compound, C 5 H 4 N 4 O 3 , present in mammalian urine in small amounts, and the principal nitrogenous component of the excrement of reptiles and birds, that in the form of its salts occurs in the joints in gout and as the major constituent of kidney stones.
  2. Chemistry. a white, crystalline, odorless, tasteless, very slightly water-soluble powder form of this compound, obtained chiefly from urine or bird excrement or synthesized, used chiefly in organic synthesis.


uric acid

noun

  1. a white odourless tasteless crystalline product of protein metabolism, present in the blood and urine; 2,6,8-trihydroxypurine. Formula: C 5 H 4 N 4 O 3


uric acid

/ yrĭk /

  1. The chief nitrogen-containing waste product excreted in the urine of birds, insects, and most reptiles. It is produced by the breakdown of amino acids in the liver. Uric acid is also produced in small quantities in humans by the breakdown of purines, and elevated levels in the blood can lead to gout. Chemical formula: C 5 H 4 N 4 O 3 .


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Other Words From

  • uric-acid adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of uric acid1

First recorded in 1790–1800
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Example Sentences

The amount of the other purin bodies together is about one-tenth that of uric acid.

Uric acid is decreased before an attack of gout and increased afterward, but its etiologic relation is still uncertain.

An increase is also noted in the uric-acid diathesis and in diseases accompanied by respiratory insufficiency.

Factors which favor an early deposit are high acidity, diminished urinary pigments, and excessive excretion of uric acid.

When treated with hydrochloric or acetic acid they slowly dissolve and rhombic crystals of uric acid appear.

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