vehicle

[vee-i-kuh l or, sometimes, vee-hi-]
See more synonyms for vehicle on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. any means in or by which someone travels or something is carried or conveyed; a means of conveyance or transport: a motor vehicle; space vehicles.
  2. a conveyance moving on wheels, runners, tracks, or the like, as a cart, sled, automobile, or tractor.
  3. a means of transmission or passage: Air is the vehicle of sound.
  4. a carrier, as of infection.
  5. a medium of communication, expression, or display: The novel is a fitting vehicle for his talents. Language is the vehicle of thought.
  6. Theater, Movies. a play, screenplay, or the like, having a role suited to the talents of and often written for a specific performer.
  7. a means of accomplishing a purpose: College is a vehicle for success.
  8. Rhetoric. the thing or idea to which the subject of a metaphor is compared, as “rose” in “she is a rose.”Compare tenor(def 3).
  9. Pharmacology. a substance, usually fluid, possessing little or no medicinal action, used as a medium for active remedies.
  10. Painting. a liquid, as oil, in which a pigment is mixed before being applied to a surface.

Origin of vehicle

1605–15; < Latin vehiculum, equivalent to veh(ere) to convey + -i- -i- + -culum -cle2

Pronunciation note

Because the primary stress in vehicle is on the first syllable, the [h] /h/ in the second syllable tends to disappear: [vee-i-kuh l] /ˈvi ɪ kəl/. A pronunciation with primary stress on the second syllable and a fully pronounced [h] /h/ is usually considered nonstandard: [vee-hik-uh l] /viˈhɪk əl/. In the adjective vehicular, where the primary stress is normally on the second syllable, the [h] /h/ is always pronounced.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for vehicle

Contemporary Examples of vehicle

Historical Examples of vehicle

  • Vast crowds lined the route, afoot and in every kind of vehicle.

    The Grand Old Man

    Richard B. Cook

  • The buck-board is the only vehicle possible over these mountain-roads.

    The Underdog

    F. Hopkinson Smith

  • In the vehicle in which I drove to the station the kind man had put a basket of food.

    My Double Life

    Sarah Bernhardt

  • I got out of the vehicle with the infirmary attendant and his assistant.

    My Double Life

    Sarah Bernhardt

  • Once our vehicle entered an elevator and was let down a brief distance.


British Dictionary definitions for vehicle

vehicle

noun
  1. any conveyance in or by which people or objects are transported, esp one fitted with wheels
  2. a medium for the expression, communication, or achievement of ideas, information, power, etc
  3. pharmacol a therapeutically inactive substance mixed with the active ingredient to give bulk to a medicine
  4. Also called: base a painting medium, such as oil, in which pigments are suspended
  5. (in the performing arts) a play, musical composition, etc, that enables a particular performer to display his talents
  6. a rocket excluding its payload
Derived Formsvehicular (vɪˈhɪkjʊlə), adjective

Word Origin for vehicle

C17: from Latin vehiculum, from vehere to carry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for vehicle
n.

1610s, "a medium through which a drug or medicine is administered," also "any means of conveying or transmitting," from French véhicule, from Latin vehiculum "means of transport, a vehicle," from vehere "to carry," from PIE *wegh- "to go, transport in a vehicle" (cf. Old English wegan "to carry;" Old Norse vegr, Old High German weg "way;" Middle Dutch wagen "wagon;" see wagon). Sense of "cart or other conveyance" first recorded 1650s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

vehicle in Medicine

vehicle

[vēĭ-kəl]
n.
  1. A substance of no therapeutic value that is used to convey an active medicine for administration.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.