Dictionary.com

ventri-

Save This Word!

variant of ventro-.
QUIZ
QUIZ YOURSELF ON AFFECT VS. EFFECT!
In effect, this quiz will prove whether or not you have the skills to know the difference between “affect” and “effect.”
Question 1 of 7
The rainy weather could not ________ my elated spirits on my graduation day.
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help
Also ventr-.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

WORDS THAT USE VENTRI-

What does ventri- mean?

Ventri- is a combining form used like a prefix meaning “abdomen.” It is sometimes used in medical and scientific terms.

Ventri- comes from the Latin venter, meaning “belly, womb.”

What are variants of ventri-?

When combined with words or word elements that begin with a vowel, ventri- becomes ventr-, as in ventrad. Ventro-, as in ventrolateral, is also a variant of ventri-.

Want to know more? Read our Words That Use ventro- article.

Examples of ventri-

One medical term that features ventri- is ventriduction, meaning “the drawing of a body part toward the abdomen or the abdominal wall.”

As we know, ventri- means “abdomen.” The second part of the word, -duction, comes from a Latin root variously meaning “leading, bringing, conducting.” So, ventriduction literally translates to “leading towards the abdomen.”

And have you ever seen a ventriloquist make it seem like their dummy’s talking? It comes from the Latin ventriloquus, which is composed of the Latin ventri- (“stomach”) and a derivative of loquī, “to speak.” That means a ventriloquist is literally a “stomach talker”!

What are some other forms that ventri- may be commonly confused with?

 

 

Despite starting with the letters ventri-, the word ventricle, referring especially to the lower chambers of the heart, doesn’t exactly use ventri- as a combining form. That said, ventricle still ultimately derives from the Latin word venter. The Latin word ventriculus literally means “little belly”—a good word for a ventricle or other such hollow organ or cavity.

Break it down!

Ventricose is another word from the Latin venter, meaning “belly, womb.”

Ventricose means “swollen,” often in reference to a particular body part. Based on what you know about the combining form ventri-, what body part can be specifically described as ventricose?

How to use ventri- in a sentence

FEEDBACK