veritable

[ver-i-tuh-buhl]
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Origin of veritable

1425–75; late Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French. See verity, -able
Related formsver·i·ta·ble·ness, nounver·i·ta·bly, adverbnon·ver·i·ta·ble, adjectivenon·ver·i·ta·ble·ness, nounnon·ver·i·ta·bly, adverbun·ver·i·ta·ble, adjectiveun·ver·i·ta·ble·ness, nounun·ver·i·ta·bly, adverb

Synonyms for veritable

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Synonym study

1. See authentic.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for veritable

Contemporary Examples of veritable

Historical Examples of veritable

  • She seemed to bring a veritable shower of song into this home of long silences.

    Dust

    Mr. and Mrs. Haldeman-Julius

  • The first performance was a veritable little triumph for me!

    My Double Life

    Sarah Bernhardt

  • But the window scene on the first night was a veritable triumph.

    My Double Life

    Sarah Bernhardt

  • A veritable Eden thought Stanley Fyles—complete to the last detail.

    The Law-Breakers

    Ridgwell Cullum

  • It is your grand state medicine, your veritable Doctor Sangrado!

    Vivian Grey

    Earl of Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli


British Dictionary definitions for veritable

veritable

adjective (prenominal)
  1. (intensifier; usually qualifying a word used metaphorically)he's a veritable swine!
  2. rare genuine or true; properI require veritable proof
Derived Formsveritableness, nounveritably, adverb

Word Origin for veritable

C15: from Old French, from vérité truth; see verity
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for veritable
adj.

late 15c., from Anglo-French and Old French veritable "true," from verité (see verity) + -able. Probably lost mid-17c. and reborrowed or revived after 1830. Related: Veritably.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper