vermiculate

[ verb ver-mik-yuh-leyt; adjective ver-mik-yuh-lit, -leyt ]
/ verb vərˈmɪk yəˌleɪt; adjective vərˈmɪk yə lɪt, -ˌleɪt /

verb (used with object), ver·mic·u·lat·ed, ver·mic·u·lat·ing.

to work or ornament with wavy lines or markings resembling the form or tracks of a worm.

adjective Also ver·mic·u·lat·ed [ver-mik-yuh-ley-tid]. /vərˈmɪk yəˌleɪ tɪd/.

worm-eaten, or appearing as if worm-eaten.
sinuous; tortuous; intricate: vermiculate thought processes.

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Origin of vermiculate

First recorded in 1595–1605, vermiculate is from the Latin word vermiculātus (past participle of vermiculārī to be worm-eaten). See vermicule, -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM vermiculate

ver·mic·u·la·tion, nounun·ver·mic·u·lat·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for vermiculate

British Dictionary definitions for vermiculate

vermiculate

verb (vɜːˈmɪkjʊˌleɪt)

(tr) to decorate with wavy or wormlike tracery or markings

adjective (vɜːˈmɪkjʊlɪt, -ˌleɪt)

vermicular; sinuous
worm-eaten or appearing as if worm-eaten
(of thoughts, etc) insinuating; subtly tortuous

Word Origin for vermiculate

C17: from Latin vermiculātus in the form of worms, from vermis worm
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012