vesture

[ ves-cher ]
/ ˈvɛs tʃər /

noun

Law.
  1. everything growing on and covering the land, with the exception of trees.
  2. any such covering, as grass or wheat.
Archaic.
  1. clothing; garments.
  2. something that covers like a garment; covering.

verb (used with object), ves·tured, ves·tur·ing.

Archaic. to clothe or cover.

Origin of vesture

1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French vesteure < Vulgar Latin *vestītūra, equivalent to Latin vestīt(us), past participle of vestīre (see vest) + -ūra -ure
Related formsves·tur·al, adjectivenon·ves·ture, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for vesture

British Dictionary definitions for vesture

vesture

/ (ˈvɛstʃə) /

noun

archaic a garment or something that seems like a garmenta vesture of cloud
law
  1. everything except trees that grows on the land
  2. a product of the land, such as grass, wheat, etc

verb

(tr) archaic to clothe
Derived Formsvestural, adjective

Word Origin for vesture

C14: from Old French, from vestir, from Latin vestīre, from vestis clothing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for vesture

vesture


n.

c.1300, from Anglo-French and Old French vesture, from Vulgar Latin *vestitura "vestments, clothing," from Latin vestivus, past participle of vestire "to clothe" (see wear).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper