vibrant

[vahy-bruh nt]
|

adjective

noun

Phonetics. a vibrant sound.

Origin of vibrant

1540–50; < Latin vibrant- (stem of vibrāns), present participle of vibrāre to shake, move to and fro; see -ant
Related formsvi·bran·cy, vi·brance, nounvi·brant·ly, adverbun·vi·brant, adjectiveun·vi·brant·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for vibrance

Historical Examples of vibrance

  • Again the blinding light struck at me, the sickening shaking of the vibrance welled through me.

  • They were great rolling clouds that seemed to envelop the entire universe with their vibrance.

    The Holes and John Smith

    Edward W. Ludwig


British Dictionary definitions for vibrance

vibrant

adjective

characterized by or exhibiting vibration; pulsating or trembling
giving an impression of vigour and activity
caused by vibration; resonant
(of colour) strong and vivid
phonetics trilled or rolled

noun

a vibrant speech sound, such as a trilled (r)
Derived Formsvibrancy, nounvibrantly, adverb

Word Origin for vibrant

C16: from Latin vibrāre to agitate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for vibrance

vibrant

adj.

1550s, "agitated," from Latin vibrantem (nominative vibrans) "swaying," present participle of vibrare "move to and fro" (see vibrate). Meaning "vigorous, full of life" is first recorded 1860. Related: Vibrantly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper