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vice

1
[ vahys ]
/ vaɪs /
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See synonyms for: vice / viced / vices / vicing on Thesaurus.com

noun

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Origin of vice

1
First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English, from Anglo-French, Old French, from Latin vitium “a fault, defect, vice”

synonym study for vice

See fault.

Definition for vice (2 of 4)

vice2
[ vahys ]
/ vaɪs /

noun, verb (used with object), viced, vic·ing.

Definition for vice (3 of 4)

vice3
[ vahy-see, -suh, vahys ]
/ ˈvaɪ si, -sə, vaɪs /

preposition

instead of; in the place of: The committee was reorganized, with Mr. Silver, vice Mr. Cooper, as the head.

Origin of vice

3
First recorded in 1760–70; from Latin: literally, “instead of,” ablative of vicis (genitive; not attested in nominative) “recurring action, turn, interchange, alternation”

Definition for vice (4 of 4)

vice-

a combining form meaning “deputy,” used in the formation of compound words, usually titles of officials who serve in the absence of the official denoted by the base word: viceroy; vice-chancellor.

Origin of vice-

Middle English ≪ Latin vicevice3
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for vice

British Dictionary definitions for vice (1 of 5)

vice1
/ (vaɪs) /

noun

an immoral, wicked, or evil habit, action, or trait
habitual or frequent indulgence in pernicious, immoral, or degrading practices
a specific form of pernicious conduct, esp prostitution or sexual perversion
a failing or imperfection in character, conduct, etcsmoking is his only vice
pathol obsolete any physical defect or imperfection
a bad trick or disposition, as of horses, dogs, etc

Derived forms of vice

viceless, adjective

Word Origin for vice

C13: via Old French from Latin vitium a defect

British Dictionary definitions for vice (2 of 5)

vice2

often US vise

/ (vaɪs) /

noun

an appliance for holding an object while work is done upon it, usually having a pair of jaws

verb

(tr) to grip (something) with or as if with a vice

Derived forms of vice

vicelike or US viselike, adjective

Word Origin for vice

C15: from Old French vis a screw, from Latin vītis vine, plant with spiralling tendrils (hence the later meaning)

British Dictionary definitions for vice (3 of 5)

vice3
/ (vaɪs) /

adjective

  1. (prenominal) serving in the place of or as a deputy for
  2. (in combination)viceroy

noun

informal a person who serves as a deputy to another

Word Origin for vice

C18: from Latin vice, from vicis interchange

British Dictionary definitions for vice (4 of 5)

vice4
/ (ˈvaɪsɪ) /

preposition

instead of; as a substitute for

Word Origin for vice

C16: from Latin, ablative of vicis change

British Dictionary definitions for vice (5 of 5)

Vice
/ (vaɪs) /

noun

(in English morality plays) a character personifying a particular vice or vice in general
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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