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virgule

[ vur-gyool ]
/ ˈvɜr gyul /
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Definition of virgule

noun
a short oblique stroke (/) between two words indicating that whichever is appropriate may be chosen to complete the sense of the text in which they occur: The defendant and his/her attorney must appear in court.
a dividing line, as in dates, fractions, a run-in passage of poetry to show verse division, etc.: 3/21/27; “Sweetest love, I do not go/For weariness of thee.” (John Donne)
a short oblique stroke (/) used in computing; a forward slash.
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Also called diagonal, separatrix, shilling mark, slant, slash, solidus ; especially British, stroke .

Origin of virgule

First recorded in 1830–40; from French virgule “comma, little rod,” from Latin virgula;see virgulate

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH virgule

backslash, forward slash, virgule
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use virgule in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for virgule

virgule
/ (ˈvɜːɡjuːl) /

noun
printing another name for solidus

Word Origin for virgule

C19: from French: comma, from Latin virgula a little rod, from virga rod
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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