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vulnerable

[ vuhl-ner-uh-buhl ]
/ ˈvʌl nər ə bəl /
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See synonyms for: vulnerable / vulnerability / vulnerableness on Thesaurus.com

adjective
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Origin of vulnerable

First recorded in 1610–20; from Late Latin vulnerābilis “injurious, wounding,” equivalent to Latin vulnerā(re) “to wound” + -bilis; see -ble

OTHER WORDS FROM vulnerable

vul·ner·a·bil·i·ty [vuhl-ner-uh-bil-i-tee], /ˌvʌl nər əˈbɪl ɪ ti/, vul·ner·a·ble·ness, nounvul·ner·a·bly, adverbun·vul·ner·a·ble, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH vulnerable

venerable, vulnerable
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use vulnerable in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for vulnerable

vulnerable
/ (ˈvʌlnərəbəl) /

adjective
capable of being physically or emotionally wounded or hurt
open to temptation, persuasion, censure, etc
liable or exposed to disease, disaster, etc
military liable or exposed to attack
bridge (of a side who have won one game towards rubber) subject to increased bonuses or penalties

Derived forms of vulnerable

vulnerability or vulnerableness, nounvulnerably, adverb

Word Origin for vulnerable

C17: from Late Latin vulnerābilis, from Latin vulnerāre to wound, from vulnus a wound
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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