wad

1
[ wod ]
/ wɒd /

noun

verb (used with object), wad·ded, wad·ding.

verb (used without object), wad·ded, wad·ding.

to become formed into a wad: The damp tissues had wadded in his pocket.

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Idioms for wad

    shoot one's wad, Informal.
    1. to spend all one's money: He shot his wad on a new car.
    2. to expend all one's energies or resources at one time: She shot her wad writing her first novel and her second wasn't as good.
    3. Slang: Vulgar. (of a man) to have an orgasm.

Origin of wad

1
1530–40; <Medieval Latin wadda<Arabic bāṭa'in lining of a garment, batting; compare French ouate,Dutch watte,Swedish vadd

OTHER WORDS FROM wad

wadder, nounun·wad·ded, adjective

Definition for wad (2 of 2)

wad2
[ wod ]
/ wɒd /

noun

a soft, earthy, black to dark-brown mass of manganese oxide minerals.

Origin of wad

2
First recorded in 1605–15; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for wad

British Dictionary definitions for wad (1 of 2)

wad1
/ (wɒd) /

noun

verb wads, wadding or wadded

Derived forms of wad

wadder, noun

Word Origin for wad

C14: from Late Latin wadda; related to German Watte cotton wool

British Dictionary definitions for wad (2 of 2)

wad2
/ (wɒd) /

noun

a soft dark earthy amorphous material consisting of decomposed manganese minerals: occurs in damp marshy areas

Word Origin for wad

C17: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012