wad

1
[ wod ]
/ wɒd /
See synonyms for: wad / wadded / wadding / wadder on Thesaurus.com

noun

verb (used with object), wad·ded, wad·ding.

verb (used without object), wad·ded, wad·ding.

to become formed into a wad: The damp tissues had wadded in his pocket.

QUIZZES

LEARN THE SPANISH WORDS FOR THESE COMMON ANIMALS!

Are you learning Spanish? Or do you just have an interest in foreign languages? Either way, this quiz on Spanish words for animals is for you.
Question 1 of 13
How do you say “cat” 🐈 in Spanish?

Idioms for wad

    shoot one's wad, Informal.
    1. to spend all one's money: He shot his wad on a new car.
    2. to expend all one's energies or resources at one time: She shot her wad writing her first novel and her second wasn't as good.
    3. Slang: Vulgar. (of a man) to have an orgasm.

Origin of wad

1
1530–40; <Medieval Latin wadda<Arabic bāṭa'in lining of a garment, batting; compare French ouate,Dutch watte,Swedish vadd

OTHER WORDS FROM wad

wadder, nounun·wad·ded, adjective

Definition for wad (2 of 2)

wad2
[ wod ]
/ wɒd /

noun

a soft, earthy, black to dark-brown mass of manganese oxide minerals.

Origin of wad

2
First recorded in 1605–15; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for wad

British Dictionary definitions for wad (1 of 2)

wad1
/ (wɒd) /

noun

verb wads, wadding or wadded

Derived forms of wad

wadder, noun

Word Origin for wad

C14: from Late Latin wadda; related to German Watte cotton wool

British Dictionary definitions for wad (2 of 2)

wad2
/ (wɒd) /

noun

a soft dark earthy amorphous material consisting of decomposed manganese minerals: occurs in damp marshy areas

Word Origin for wad

C17: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012