Origin of wade

before 900; Middle English waden to go, wade, Old English wadan to go; cognate with German waten, Old Norse vatha; akin to Old English wæd ford, sea, Latin vadum shoal, ford, vādere to go, rush

Related forms

un·wad·ed, adjectiveun·wad·ing, adjective

Definition for wade (2 of 2)

Wade

[ weyd ]
/ weɪd /

noun

Benjamin Franklin,1800–78, U.S. lawyer and antislavery politician.
a male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for wade

British Dictionary definitions for wade (1 of 2)

wade

/ (weɪd) /

verb

to walk with the feet immersed in (water, a stream, etc)the girls waded the river at the ford
(intr often foll by through) to proceed with difficultyto wade through a book
(intr; foll by in or into) to attack energetically

noun

the act or an instance of wading

Derived Forms

wadable or wadeable, adjective

Word Origin for wade

Old English wadan; related to Old Frisian wada, Old High German watan, Old Norse vatha, Latin vadum ford

British Dictionary definitions for wade (2 of 2)

Wade

/ (weɪd) /

noun

(Sarah) Virginia. born 1945, English tennis player; won three Grand Slam singles titles: US Open (1968), Australian Open (1972), and Wimbledon (1977)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012