QUIZZES

This Word Of The Day Quiz Is Far From Thersitical
Have you mastered the meaning of phronesis? How about plethoric? Take the quiz on the words from the week of February 17 to 23 to find out.
Question 1 of 7
Lincolnesque

Origin of wade

before 900; Middle English waden to go, wade, Old English wadan to go; cognate with German waten, Old Norse vatha; akin to Old English wæd ford, sea, Latin vadum shoal, ford, vādere to go, rush

OTHER WORDS FROM wade

un·wad·ed, adjectiveun·wad·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for wade in (1 of 2)

wade
/ (weɪd) /

verb

to walk with the feet immersed in (water, a stream, etc)the girls waded the river at the ford
(intr often foll by through) to proceed with difficultyto wade through a book
(intr; foll by in or into) to attack energetically

noun

the act or an instance of wading

Derived forms of wade

wadable or wadeable, adjective

Word Origin for wade

Old English wadan; related to Old Frisian wada, Old High German watan, Old Norse vatha, Latin vadum ford

British Dictionary definitions for wade in (2 of 2)

Wade
/ (weɪd) /

noun

(Sarah) Virginia. born 1945, English tennis player; won three Grand Slam singles titles: US Open (1968), Australian Open (1972), and Wimbledon (1977)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with wade in

wade in

Also, wade into. Plunge into, begin or attack resolutely and energetically, as in She waded into that pile of correspondence. This idiom transfers entering water to beginning some action. [Mid-1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.