want

[ wont, wawnt ]
/ wɒnt, wɔnt /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

noun

Idioms for want

    want in/out, Chiefly Midland.
    1. to desire to enter or leave: The cat wants in.
    2. Informal. to desire acceptance in or release from something specified: I talked with Louie about our plan, and he wants in.

Origin of want

1150–1200; Middle English wante < Old Norse vanta to lack

OTHER WORDS FROM want

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH want

unwanted unwontedwant wont

synonym study for want

1. See wish. 3. See lack. 15. See poverty.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for want in (1 of 2)

want1
/ (wɒnt) /

verb

noun

Derived forms of want

wanter, noun

Word Origin for want

C12 (vb, in the sense: it is lacking), C13 (n): from Old Norse vanta to be deficient; related to Old English wanian to wane

British Dictionary definitions for want in (2 of 2)

want2
/ (wɒnt) /

noun

English dialect a mole

Word Origin for want

Old English wand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with want in (1 of 2)

want in

1

Desire to enter, as in The cat wants in. The antonym is want out, as in The dog wants out. [First half of 1800s]

2

Wish to join a business, project, or other undertaking, as in Some investors want in but have not yet been admitted. Again, the antonym is want out, as in Many Quebec residents want out of Canada. [Mid-1900s]

Idioms and Phrases with want in (2 of 2)

want

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.