waxing

[ wak-sing ]
/ ˈwæk sɪŋ /

noun

the act or process of applying wax, as in polishing or filling.
the manufacturing of a phonograph record.
the act or technique of applying a depilatory wax to the body for removing hair.

Origin of waxing

late Middle English word dating back to 1400–50; see origin at wax1, -ing1

OTHER WORDS FROM waxing

non·wax·ing, adjective

Definition for waxing (2 of 3)

wax1
[ waks ]
/ wæks /

noun

verb (used with object)

adjective

pertaining to, made of, or resembling wax: a wax candle; a wax doll.

Origin of wax

1
before 900; (noun) Middle English wex, waxe, Old English weax; cognate with Dutch was, German Wachs, Old Norse vax; (v.) Middle English wexen, derivative of the noun

OTHER WORDS FROM wax

wax·a·ble, adjectivewax·like, adjective

Definition for waxing (3 of 3)

wax2
[ waks ]
/ wæks /

verb (used without object), waxed; waxed or (Literary) wax·en; wax·ing.

to increase in extent, quantity, intensity, power, etc.: Discord waxed at an alarming rate.
(of the moon) to increase in the extent of its illuminated portion before the full moon.Compare wane(def 4).
to grow or become: He waxed angry at the insinuation.

Origin of wax

2
before 900; Middle English waxen, Old English weaxan; cognate with German wachsen; akin to waist

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH wax

wane wax
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for waxing

British Dictionary definitions for waxing (1 of 3)

wax1
/ (wæks) /

noun

verb

(tr) to coat, polish, etc, with wax
to remove (body hair) by means of a wax treatment

Derived forms of wax

waxer, nounwaxlike, adjective

Word Origin for wax

Old English weax, related to Old Saxon, Old High German wahs, Old Norse vax

British Dictionary definitions for waxing (2 of 3)

wax2
/ (wæks) /

verb (intr)

to become larger, more powerful, etc
(of the moon) to show a gradually increasing portion of illuminated surface, between new moon and full moonCompare wane (def. 1)
archaic to become as specifiedthe time waxed late

Word Origin for wax

Old English weaxan; related to Old Frisian waxa, Old Saxon, Old High German wahsan, Gothic wahsjan

British Dictionary definitions for waxing (3 of 3)

wax3
/ (wæks) /

noun

British informal, old-fashioned a fit of rage or temperhe's in a wax today

Word Origin for wax

of obscure origin; perhaps from the phrase to wax angry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for waxing (1 of 2)

waxing
[ wăksĭng ]

n.

The shaping of the contours of a trial denture or crown in wax prior to its casting in metal.

Medicine definitions for waxing (2 of 2)

wax
[ wăks ]

n.

Any of various natural, oily or greasy heat-sensitive substances, consisting of hydrocarbons or esters of fatty acids that are insoluble in water but soluble in most organic solvents.
Cerumen.
A solid plastic or pliable liquid substance, such as paraffin, originating from petroleum and found in rock layers and often used in medicinal preparations.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for waxing

wax
[ wăks ]

Any of various solid, usually yellow substances that melt or soften easily when heated. They are similar to fats, but are less greasy and more brittle. Naturally occurring animal and plant waxes are esters of saturated fatty acids and alcohols of high molecular weight, including sterols. Waxes are also manufactured synthetically from petroleum, and are used to make polishers, lubricants, coatings, waterproofing, crayons, candles, and many other products.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with waxing

wax

In addition to the idiom beginning with wax

  • wax and wane

also see:

  • whole ball of wax
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.