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View synonyms for whaling

whaling

[ hwey-ling, wey- ]

noun

  1. the work or industry of capturing and rendering whales; whale fishing.
  2. Digital Technology. a phishing attempt by someone posing as a company’s attorney, CEO, vendor, or other authorized entity in order to scam a payroll department, corporate executive, etc., out of money or confidential information:

    The source of the whaling gave all appearances of legitimacy and trustworthiness.



whaling

/ ˈweɪlɪŋ /

noun

  1. the work or industry of hunting and processing whales for food, oil, etc


adverb

  1. informal.
    (intensifier)

    a whaling good time

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Other Words From

  • anti·whaling adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of whaling1

whale 1 + -ing 1; whaling def 1 was first recorded in 1680–90; whaling def 2 in 2010–15 (in the sense “hunting for a big fish/phish”)
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Example Sentences

In the 18th and 19th centuries, these societies were confronted with the terrors of commercial whaling.

Legislation passed in the 1970s effectively put a stop to commercial whaling in the United States.

It was developed by islanders who from at least the 18th century survived by trading woolen products with the crews on passing cargo, fishing and whaling ships.

This whaling drove the global population from perhaps 100,000 to as few as 500 whales in 1920.

Smith says he’s now trying to determine if human activities, such as whaling, have led to the extinction of any of these unusual creatures.

His great grandfather sailed from Cape Verde and was involved in the whaling industry of Nantucket Island, Mass.

The Japanese will have to give up whaling “research” that killed many hundreds of the huge sea mammals each year.

The Court concluded that the hunts are actually whaling expeditions, not scientific research as Japan has claimed for many years.

Many argued that the feasibility study itself was commercial whaling.

I do have a certain amount of moral discomfort because of the situation with whaling.

And as for this other thing—the industrial side of it: that's a large order; a whaling big order.

The business isn't what it was; in the old days whale-oil was worth a great deal and whaling was a good business.

Well, if the oil is replaced and whalebone has no value, what is to be got out of whaling now, then?

But Portsmouth is not the place for whaling vessels, not one such being there.

Five new whalers are to be added to the whaling fleet of Peterhead next season.

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whalesuckerwhaling port