winged

[ wingd or, esp. Literary, wing-id ]
/ wɪŋd or, esp. Literary, ˈwɪŋ ɪd /

adjective


Nearby words

  1. wingate,
  2. wingback,
  3. wingback formation,
  4. wingding,
  5. winge,
  6. winged bean,
  7. winged catheter,
  8. winged elm,
  9. winged everlasting,
  10. winged horse

Origin of winged

Middle English word dating back to 1350–1400; see origin at wing, -ed3

Related forms

wing

[ wing ]
/ wɪŋ /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to travel on or as if on wings; fly; soar: They are winging to the coast.

Origin of wing

1125–75; Middle English wenge (plural noun) < Old Danish wingæ; compare Norwegian, Swedish vinge, Old Norse vǣngr

Related formsout·wing, verb (used with object)

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for winged


British Dictionary definitions for winged

winged

/ (wɪŋd) /

adjective

furnished with wingswinged god; winged horse
flying straight and true as if by wingwinged words

wing

/ (wɪŋ) /

noun

verb (mainly tr)

Derived Formswinglike, adjective

Word Origin for wing

C12: from Scandinavian; compare Old Norse vǣngir (plural), Norwegian veng

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for winged

wing

n.

late 12c., wenge, from Old Norse vængr "wing of a bird, aisle, etc." (cf. Danish and Swedish vinge "wing"), of unknown origin, perhaps from a Proto-Germanic *we-ingjaz and ultimately from PIE root *we- "blow" (cf. Old English wawan "to blow;" see wind (n.)). Replaced Old English feðra (plural) "wings" (see feather). The meaning "either of two divisions of a political party, army, etc." is first recorded c.1400; theatrical sense is from 1790.

Verbal phrase wing it (1885) is from theatrical slang sense of an actor learning his lines in the wings before going onstage, or else not learning them at all and being fed by a prompter in the wings. The verb to wing "shoot a bird in the wing" is from 1802. The slang sense of to earn (one's) wings is 1940s, from the wing-shaped badges awarded to air cadets on graduation. To be under (someone's) wing "protected by (someone)" is recorded from early 13c. Phrase on a wing and a prayer is title of a 1943 song about landing a damaged aircraft.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for winged

wing

[ wĭng ]

n.

Any of various paired movable organs of flight, such as the modified forelimb of a bird or bat or one of the membranous organs extending from the thorax of an insect.
Something that resembles a wing in appearance, function, or position relative to a main body.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for winged

wing

[ wĭng ]

One of a pair of specialized parts used for flying, as in birds, bats, or insects.
A thin, papery projection on certain fruits that are dispersed by the wind, such as the fruits of ash, elm, and maple trees. See also samara.
A part extending from the side of an aircraft, such as an airplane, having a curved upper surface that causes the pressure of air rushing over it to decrease, thereby providing lift.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with winged

wing

In addition to the idiom beginning with wing

  • wing it

also see:

  • clip someone's wings
  • in the wings
  • left wing
  • on the wing
  • take flight (wing)
  • under someone's wing
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.