Dictionary.com

wite

1

or wyte

[ wahyt ]
/ waɪt /
Save This Word!

noun

(in Anglo-Saxon law)
  1. a fine imposed by a king or lord on a subject who committed a serious crime.
  2. a fee demanded for granting a special privilege.
Chiefly Scot. responsibility for a crime, fault, or misfortune; blame.

verb (used with object), wit·ed, wit·ing.

Chiefly Scot. to blame for; declare guilty of.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!

Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

Meet Grammar Coach

Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing

Meet Grammar Coach

Improve Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of wite

1
before 900; (noun) Middle English, Old English wīte penalty; cognate with Old High German wīzi,Old Norse vīti; (v.) Middle English witen,Old English wītan to blame

Definition for wite (2 of 2)

wite2
[ wahyt ]
/ waɪt /

verb

a present plural of wit2.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for wite

FEEDBACK