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withers

[ with-erz ]

noun

, (used with a plural verb)
  1. the highest part of the back at the base of the neck of a horse, cow, sheep, etc.


withers

/ ˈwɪðəz /

plural noun

  1. the highest part of the back of a horse, behind the neck between the shoulders


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Word History and Origins

Origin of withers1

First recorded in 1535–45; origin uncertain
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Word History and Origins

Origin of withers1

C16: short for widersones, from wider with + -sones, perhaps variant of sinew ; related to German Widerrist, Old English withre resistance
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Idioms and Phrases

Idioms
  1. wring one's withers, to cause one anxiety or trouble:

    The long involved lawsuit is wringing his withers.

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Example Sentences

Not to be Confused WithThe Best of Bill Withers: Lean on Me.

When what Toynbee called a “creative minority” does not rise to the occasion of a great challenge, society withers and dies.

Under such conditions, the genius of a nation withers and dies.

On certain of the stems the fertile cone appears and the spores are ripened about June, after which the process withers.

It is sincerely to be hoped that a little later we shall have a continuation of the work from Mr. Withers' pen.

Dressed Monte's withers with liniment greatly reducing swelling from saddle-gall.

Mrs. Mallaby Deeley is doing good work in securing withers for horses.

Unlike his pony prototypes, his was a lengthy, arched neck, held high from narrowing withers and a short back.

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Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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wither on the vinewithershins