Dictionary.com

withy

[ with-ee, with-ee ]
/ ˈwɪð i, ˈwɪθ i /
Chiefly British
Save This Word!

noun, plural with·ies.
a willow.
a pliable branch or twig, especially a withe.
a band, loop, halter, or rope of slender twigs; widdy.
adjective, with·i·er, with·i·est.
made of pliable branches or twigs, especially of withes.
flexible; pliable.
QUIZ
SPRINT TO THE FINISH WITH THIS OLYMPICS QUIZ!
Compete in our Olympics quiz to see if you can take home the gold medal in Olympics knowledge.
Question 1 of 10
Where was the Olympics first held?
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of withy

before 1000; Middle English; Old English wīthig; akin to withe, Old Norse vīthir,Old High German wīda,Greek ītéa willow, Latin vītis vine
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use withy in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for withy

withy
/ (ˈwɪðɪ) /

noun plural withies
a variant spelling of withe (def. 1), withe (def. 2)
a willow tree, esp an osier
adjective
(of people) tough and agile
rare resembling a withe in strength or flexibility

Word Origin for withy

Old English wīdig (e); related to Old Norse vīthir, Old High German wīda, Latin vītis vine, Sanskrit vītika fetter. See withe, wire
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK