withy

[ with-ee, with-ee ]
/ ˈwɪð i, ˈwɪθ i /
Chiefly British

noun, plural with·ies.

a willow.
a pliable branch or twig, especially a withe.
a band, loop, halter, or rope of slender twigs; widdy.

adjective, with·i·er, with·i·est.

made of pliable branches or twigs, especially of withes.
flexible; pliable.

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Origin of withy

before 1000; Middle English; Old English wīthig; akin to withe, Old Norse vīthir,Old High German wīda,Greek ītéa willow, Latin vītis vine
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for withy

British Dictionary definitions for withy

withy
/ (ˈwɪðɪ) /

noun plural withies

a variant spelling of withe (def. 1), withe (def. 2)
a willow tree, esp an osier

adjective

(of people) tough and agile
rare resembling a withe in strength or flexibility

Word Origin for withy

Old English wīdig (e); related to Old Norse vīthir, Old High German wīda, Latin vītis vine, Sanskrit vītika fetter. See withe, wire
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012