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Wittenberg

[ wit-n-burg; German vit-n-berk ]

noun

  1. a city in central eastern Germany, on the Elbe, where Luther taught in the university and launched the Reformation in 1517 by posting his Ninety-Five Theses on a church door.


Wittenberg

/ ˈwɪtənˌbɜːɡ; ˈvɪtənbɛrk /

noun

  1. a city in E Germany, on the River Elbe, in Brandenburg: Martin Luther, as a philosophy teacher at Wittenberg university, began the Reformation here in 1517 by nailing his 95 theses to the doors of a church. Pop: 46 295 (2003 est)


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Word History and Origins

Origin of Wittenberg1

Literally, “white mountain,” from Low German witt “white” + German Berg “mountain”; iceberg ( def ), white ( def )

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Example Sentences

Then, taking advantage of the historical diffusion from Wittenberg, they show that for every 100 kilometers traveled from Wittenberg, the percentage of Protestants in a county dropped by 10 percent.

“It used to be that moms are home with the babies while everyone else was out in the world,” says Wittenberg.

So he went back to Germany—first to Wittenberg, thence, driven by the plague, to Rostock.

Nor can there be any doubt but that at first the peasants looked to Wittenberg for aid, support and guidance.

But Wittenberg had no use for Bruno—he believed too much, or too little, Luther could not tell which.

He went to Wittenberg, in his innocence, intending to tack on the church-door there his theses.

After Wittenberg came Leipzig, famed as the home of immortal Baedeker.

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