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Wordsworth

[ wurdz-wurth ]
/ ˈwɜrdzˌwɜrθ /
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noun

William, 1770–1850, English poet: poet laureate 1843–50.

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“Evoke” and “invoke” both derive from the same Latin root “vocāre.”

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OTHER WORDS FROM Wordsworth

Words·worth·i·an, adjective, nounWords·worth·i·an·ism, noun
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How to use Wordsworth in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for Wordsworth

Wordsworth
/ (ˈwɜːdzˌwəθ) /

noun

Dorothy. 1771–1855, English writer, whose Journals are noted esp for their descriptions of nature
her brother, William . 1770–1850, English poet, whose work, celebrating nature, was greatly inspired by the Lake District, in which he spent most of his life. Lyrical Ballads (1798), to which Coleridge contributed, is often taken as the first example of English romantic poetry and includes his Lines Written above Tintern Abbey. Among his other works are The Prelude (completed in 1805; revised thereafter and published posthumously) and Poems in Two Volumes (1807), which includes The Solitary Reaper and Intimations of Immortality

Derived forms of Wordsworth

Wordsworthian (ˌwɜːdzˈwɜːðɪən), adjective, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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