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workout

[ wurk-out ]
/ ˈwɜrkˌaʊt /
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noun
a trial or practice session in athletics, as in running, boxing, or football.
a structured regime of physical exercise: She goes to the gym for a workout twice a week.
any trial or practice session.
an act or instance of working something out.
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Origin of workout

First recorded in 1890–95; noun use of verb phrase work out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use workout in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for workout

work out

verb (adverb)
noun work-out
a session of physical exercise, esp for training or practice
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with workout

work out

1

Accomplish by work or effort, as in I think we can work out a solution to this problem. [1500s] For work out all right, see turn out all right.

2

Find a solution for, solve, as in They hoped to work out their personal differences, or Can you help me work out this equation? [Mid-1800s]

3

Formulate or develop, as in We were told to work out a new plan, or He's very good at working out complicated plots. [Early 1800s]

4

Discharge a debt by working instead of paying money, as in She promised she'd work out the rest of the rent by baby-sitting for them. [Second half of 1600s]

5

Prove effective or successful, as in I wonder if their marriage will work out.

6

Have a specific result, add up, as in It worked out that she was able to go to the party after all, or The total works out to more than a million. [Late 1800s]

7

Engage in strenuous exercise for physical conditioning, as in He works out with weights every other day. [1920s]

8

Exhaust a resource, such as a mine, as in This mine has been completely worked out. [Mid-1500s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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