worthy

[wur-thee]

adjective, wor·thi·er, wor·thi·est.

having adequate or great merit, character, or value: a worthy successor.
of commendable excellence or merit; deserving: a book worthy of praise; a person worthy to lead.

noun, plural wor·thies.

a person of eminent worth, merit, or position: The town worthies included two doctors.

Nearby words

  1. worthing,
  2. worthington,
  3. worthless,
  4. worthlessly,
  5. worthwhile,
  6. worthy of the name,
  7. wot,
  8. wotan,
  9. wotcher,
  10. wotton

Origin of worthy

Middle English word dating back to 1175–1225; see origin at worth1, -y1

Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for worthiness


British Dictionary definitions for worthiness

worthy

adjective -thier or -thiest

(postpositive; often foll by of or an infinitive) having sufficient merit or value (for something or someone specified); deserving
having worth, value, or merit

noun plural -thies

often facetious a person of distinguished character, merit, or importance
Derived Formsworthily, adverbworthiness, noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for worthiness

worthy

adj.

mid-13c., "having merit," from worth (n.) + -y (2). Old English had weorþful in this sense. Attested from c.1300 as a noun meaning "person of merit" (especially in Nine Worthies, famous men of history and legend: Joshua, David, Judas Maccabæus, Hector, Alexander, Julius Cæsar, Arthur, Charlemagne, Godfrey of Bouillon -- three Jews, three gentiles, three Christians).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper