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zócalo

[ saw-kah-law; English soh-kuh-loh ]
/ ˈsɔ kɑˌlɔ; English ˈsoʊ kəˌloʊ /
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noun, plural zó·ca·los [saw-kah-laws; English soh-kuh-lohz]. /ˈsɔ kɑˌlɔs; English ˈsoʊ kəˌloʊz/. Mexican Spanish.
a public square or plaza, especially in the center of a city or town.
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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use zócalo in a sentence

  • In the centre was the zocalo, a green oasis of verdure laid out in winding walks and brilliant flower-beds.

  • Ned found the little door by which he had entered, and passed outside, hiding again among the trees of the Zocalo.

    The Texan Star|Joseph A. Altsheler
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