Klonopin

[klon-uh-pin]

What does Klonopin mean?

Klonopin is the brand name of the drug clonazepam. It is a type of tranquilizer used to treat seizures and anxiety disorders.

Related words:

Examples of Klonopin

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Examples of Klonopin
My hubby has such bad social anxiety but refuses to take meds. Would it be wrong of me to secretly drug him. I’m joking but man do I want to!! He so much more personable and likable after a klonopin or two.
@JtotheHellno, June, 2018
During the plea hearing, Chester admitting to writing a prescription for clonazepam, also known as Klonopin, despite knowing that the patient receiving the prescription had no legitimate medical need for the drug.
Melissa Brown, Montgomery Advertiser, June, 2018
Benzodiazepines such as Xanax, Valium, and Klonopin have been described as the quiet killer at the heart of the prescription drug epidemic. Having been overshadowed by the ongoing opioid crisis, which is centered on the abuse of legal and illegal drugs such as oxycodone, fentanyl, and heroin, abuses of anti-anxiety meds and tranquilizers often go under-the-radar.
Fabian Gorsler, Highsnobeity, June, 2018

Where does Klonopin come from?

Klonopin
emedicinehealth.com

In the 1950s, Leo Sternbach, a scientist working at the multinational pharmaceutical Hoffman-La Roche, created a new type of tranquilizer called benzodiazepines, which were less dangerous than barbituates. One type of benzodiazepine, called clonazepam, was developed in the 1960s and sold by Hoffman-La Roche Klonopin in 1975. Klonopin, here, appears to an easier-to-say but still science-y-sounding take on clonazepam.

Klonopin was first prescribed to treat epilepsy, but in subsequent decades, became a leading medication to help patients with anxiety, panic, sleep, and movement disorders as well as to help drug addicts manage withdrawals, seizures being a major symptom. Widely prescribed, Klonopin also became recreationally abused for its sleepy, calming high, joining other prescription drugs like Xanax and Oxycontin.

Klonopin is considered a Schedule IV drug by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Abuse of the drug can lead to addiction and overdose. The drug was notably found in the system of Anna Nicole Smith, who died of overdose in 2007, and David Foster Wallace, the following year.

Who uses Klonopin?

Klonopin is familiar to medical professionals, patients, and recreational drug users. It has a reputation for being widely available, very addictive, and extremely sedating. On the street, Klonopin is referred to a Kpins and being high on the drug pinning out.

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