Start each day with the Word of the Day in your inbox!

Word of the Day

Word of the day

abrogate

[ ab-ruh-geyt ] [ ˈæb rəˌgeɪt ] Show IPA Phonetic Respelling

verb

to put aside; put an end to.

learn about the english language

Why Dictionary.com chose abrogate

More about abrogate

  • First used in English between 1520–30.
  • From the Latin abrogātus, “repealed” (See ab-, rogation, -ate1).
  • The meaning has expanded from officially repealing a law (doing away with it) to delaying or avoiding to do something, like a chore or another responsibility.

EXAMPLES OF ABROGATE

  • By neglecting to attend the meetings, he was seen as trying to abrogate his duties.
  • The committee tried to abrogate its responsibility by postponing the decision until after the holidays.
quiz icon
WHAT'S YOUR WORD IQ?
Think you're a word wizard? Try our word quiz, and prove it!
TAKE THE QUIZ
arrows pointing up and down
SYNONYM OF THE DAY
Double your word knowledge with the Synonym of the Day!
SEE TODAY'S SYNONYM
Word of the Day Calendar

Word of the day

mistral

[ mis-truhl ] [ ˈmɪs trəl ] Show IPA Phonetic Respelling

noun

a cold, dry, wind common in southern France and neighboring regions.

learn about the english language

Why Dictionary.com chose mistral

More about mistral

  • First used between 1595–1605.
  • Directly from Provençal mistral meaning “dominant wind” and from Latin magistralis ventus meaning “master wind.”
  • Both dominant and master emphasize the strong nature of this regional wind.

EXAMPLES OF MISTRAL

  • Farmers in southern France prepare for the mistral by securing their crops and equipment.
  • Sailors dread the mistral because it can make navigating the Mediterranean Sea extremely challenging.
Word of the Day Calendar

Word of the day

ergo

[ ur-goh ] [ ˈɜr goʊ ] Show IPA Phonetic Respelling

adverb

therefore.

learn about the english language

Why Dictionary.com chose ergo

More about ergo

  • Borrowed into English from Latin around 1350–1400.
  • The word appears in a widely-known phrase by the philosopher and mathematician René Descartes: Cogito ergo sum, “I think, therefore I am.”

EXAMPLES OF ERGO

  • The weather forecast predicted rain, ergo, we brought our umbrellas.
  • The software had a critical flaw, ergo, it was recalled immediately.
Word of the Day Calendar
Word of the Day Calendar